How much yarn do I need for German twisted cast on?

How do you calculate yarn length for a long tail cast on?

So, for instance, if your finished project is going to be 12 inches wide, you’d want a long tail about 40 inches long (12 x 3 = 36 + 3.6 = about 40). She also reminds you to “keep your tail on your thumb,” meaning that the tail end of the yarn goes in front as you make the stitches.

Why do a German twisted cast on?

The German Twisted Cast On is a variation of the Long Tail Cast On. By adding an extra twist while casting on, this method gives a little more stretch to your edging. It is also a deeper cast on making it more durable. It works well for socks, mittens, and other ribbing that will get a lot of wear and tear.

What is best way to cast on in knitting?

How to work a knit cast on

  1. Create a slip knot. …
  2. Insert needle into the slip knot. …
  3. Bring the working yarn around the right needle tip. …
  4. Bring right needle under the left and through to the front.
  5. Bring the yarn under the right hand needle to create a loop (stitch).
  6. Transfer the stitch to left needle.
THIS IS FUNNING:  How do I keep my hair healthy under my weave?

How much does it cost to cast on for a blanket?

If you want a medium sized blanket, then try casting on 120 stitches. For a large lap blanket, cast on 160 stitches. For an extra-large lap blanket, cast on 200 stitches.

How do I know how many stitches to cast on?

The Stitches to Cast-On = (dW x S/W). Divide Stitches counted in swatch by swatch Width measured. Multiply by Desired Width. So for the example for the above you will take your 4×4 measured area.

How long should my long tail cast on be?

Convert to inches (1” per 2.54cm) and you’ve got roughly 10” minimum for the tail to cast on. Add a few more inches so that you’ll have yarn to hold on to at the end; four to five inches should do it.

What is the best cast on for knitting a hat?

The alternating cable cast on is also quite stretchy, making it nicely suited for ribbing. In fact, I sometimes refer to it as my “ribbing cast on”! While this cast on is more advanced than a long tail cast on, it’s a great technique to use for hats, mittens, socks and sweater sleeves.