Who gets the quilts at the end of the story?

Who gets the quilts at the end of the story and why?

In short, Maggie gets the quilts at the end of Walker’s “Everyday Use.” Mama initially promised the quilts to Maggie, but when Dee turns up on her visit home, she tries to convince Mama that Maggie will simply use the quilts until they turn into rags.

Why does Mama give Maggie the quilts?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

Who does mama end up giving the quilts to?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

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Why does Dee not want Maggie to have the quilts?

Johnson tells her that she’s promised the quilts to Maggie. Dee condescendingly says that Maggie “can’t appreciate” the quilts. Dee fears Maggie will use them every day. This is an absurd argument because the quilts were intended for “everyday use.”

Why did Dee want the quilts?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

What is the conflict between Dee and Maggie over?

The conflict comes to a head from the juxtaposition of the characters’ motives for wanting various items: Mama and Maggie need these objects because they put them to “Everyday Use” and Dee in only interested in them so that she can show them off and put them on display.

Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

What was Maggie going to do with the quilts?

‘” Dee wants to hang the quilts on her wall, to display them as evidence of some heritage that is in the past, that is dead. Maggie, however, knows how to quilt and would use the quilts for the reason for which they were created: to keep warm.

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Why does Dee want the quilts so bad?

Dee wants the quilts to display them in her home as symbols of this greater heritage and as symbols of that which defined her ancestor’s humanity before captivity dehumanized them. Neither Dee nor her mother are right or wrong since Dee’s mother’s sense of ancestry extends only to her valued and cherished memories.

Why does Dee change her name to Wangero?

Dee tells her mother that she has changed her name to Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo to protest being named after the people who have oppressed her. Mama tells Dee that she was in fact named after her Aunt Dicie, who was named after Grandma Dee, who bore the name of her mother as well.

How did Dee deal with her mother and sister?

Dee treats Mama and Maggie disrespectfully, taking photos of the family home as though she is a tourist and helping herself to various items from their home. She also lectures them about how they should live their lives, failing to see that they are happy with the life they already have.

Why does Maggie smile a real smile at the end of story?

Maggie has a real smile at the end of the story “Everyday Use” because she appreciates Mama coming to her defense and recognizes that she shares her feelings regarding their family’s heritage. Maggie also smiles because she feels worthy and has won a small victory against her successful, arrogant sister.